News & Recipes

Fall CSA Week 5 Five weeks in and still having fun! How are things cooking on y'alls end? We know that greens can be a bit overwhelming sometimes, but don't let that bring you down! CSA is a great learning experience - it really gets us out of our comfort zone and into a place where we can buckle down and try new things! We love all the pictures of the plates you're making; keep sending them and get featured on our Instagram and Facebook. Keep reading to see what we're harvesting and this weeks recipe. Gus picked carrots to sow because they are the only vegetable he likes to eat.           Seed starting green makeover at Whitton Farms is coming along great!!!       THIS WEEKS PRODUCE LINEUP Ginger - Laughing Stock Farm Radish - Clark Farm & Whitton Farms Sweet Potatoes - Allen Farm Kale - Clark Farm & Dettlebach Farm Peppers - Kellogg Valley Farm Rosemary - Whitton Farms Head Lettuce - Five Acre Farms BEETS! - Heifer Ranch & Clark...

Mustard Greens - are packed with fiber, vitamins, minerals and protective phytonutrients, yet because of their slimming calorie count, their nutrition-to-calorie ratio makes them one of the most nutrient-dense and beneficial foods on the planet. Mustard greens are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, and potassium. One cup of cooked mustard greens contains just 21 calories! Storing Mustard Greens Storing your greens in containers or plastic bags keeps them fresh for well over a week. Reuse clean, dry plastic produce bags from the grocery store. Immediately transfer greens and other produce into containers and store as much as will fit in the crisper drawers of the refrigerator. Wash delicate leafy greens in ice water within a few days, spin them dry in a salad spinner, and store them in the spinner. They will stay crisp and fresh for over a week. Cooking Tips Mustard greens can be eaten raw or cooked–steamed, sautéed, or simmered. Prepare mustard greens...

Fall CSA Week 4 WOW! Can you believe it? We're halfway through our fall CSA! We've gotten a lot of good feedback over the last few weeks (especially after the meat shares last week!) and we'd love to keep it up. Let us know how we're doing by sharing on Facebook and Instagram. This weeks cheese is Chevre Bouquets will be coming from Delta Sol Farm this week!   RECIPE OF THE WEEK: Chinese Cabbage Stirfry Ingredients 2 long red chillies, seeded, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, crushed 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 2 tablespoons caster sugar 60ml (1/4 cup) char siu sauce (see note) or hoisin sauce 4 pork loin steaks, thinly sliced 1/2 Chinese cabbage 2 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil 200g small green beans, trimmed 125g roasted cashews Coriander, to serve Steamed white rice, to serve Step 1 To make marinade, place chillies, garlic, vinegar, sugar and char siu sauce in a bowl and stir to combine. Add...

Black radish is different than traditional spring radishes, which are pink or purple, in that their skin is (obviously) black. They're also larger in diameter than traditional ones, ranging from 3 to 4 inches. Their flavor is more pungent, too, and their texture is a bit tougher. When peeled, their flesh is white and drier than that of other radishes. Black radishes have a longer shelf life than most radishes, so they are available year-round, although the crop peaks in winter and early spring Preparation + Cooking Thoroughly wash radishes before eating raw. Many people discard the radish greens, but they are edible and nutritious. Radish leaves have a delicious peppery taste. If radishes were purchased with the leaves attached, remove the tops unless they will be served the same day. Storing radishes for any length of time with the leaves left on will cause loss of nutrients and moisture, so if you plan...

Storing Beets Beets can keep for up to 2 to 3 weeks if stored properly. First, give the leaves and roots a good washing. Let air dry or make sure to completely dry before putting in refrigerator. Remove the greens, by leaving about 2 inches of stem attached to the root, so that bleeding does not occur. This is only necessary with red or purple beets as it does not occur with yellow and white varieties. The greens can be wrapped in paper towel and placed in a Ziploc bag where all the air has been removed. Beet greens stored in this fashion will last 2 to 5 days after purchase. Use greens in place of spinach, Swiss chard or kale in favorite recipes. Many like the greens served raw with lettuce in salads or in freshly made juice. The greens are packed full of nutritional value and should not be discarded. The root should...

Week number TWO! We're back at it this week! How was your first CSA box? We love Septembers in Arkansas - we've started to see the transition to fall both in the fields and in our boxes! This week, we'll have our first delivery of winter squash! Take a look at our storage tips and recipes we've included below. We had the pleasure of partnering with Bristro Catering & Take Away in Bryant, AR last Thursday. The event included New South veggie samples made by Chef Bonner, White River Creamery cheese, and local beer from around the state! It was truly a Taste of Arkansas event. See you again for another great CSA week! Reminders to all CSA members:   Bi-weekly members will not pickup produce shares this week. Leftover produce and cheese will be donated to First Baptist food pantry, partners with AR Hunger Relief Alliance. Please bring back your box! You can also bring...

This salad combines the sweet of the strawberries and the pecans with the sour tang of the vinaigrette. Ingredients 4 cups packed spinach leaves, stems removed 1 cup sliced strawberries ½ cup red onion, sliced into rings 1 cup toasted, sugared pecan halves 2 Tbsp butter ¼ cup sugar Classic Vinaigrette: 2 Tbs. red wine vinegar 2 tsp Dijon mustard ½ tsp kosher salt 1/3 cup olive oil Whisk together vinaigrette ingredients, leaving out the olive oil. Then, gradually whisk in the oil. Sugar Pecans: In a heavy skillet melt 2 Tbsp. butter; add ¼ cup sugar and pecans. Place over medium heat and stir constantly until pecans begin to caramelize. Remove and use wax paper to drain. Next, combine all salad ingredients and toss with vinaigrette dressing. Recipe courtesy of Sandra Karcher, Heifer Village Volunteer To learn more about volunteering with Heifer International please check out www.heifer.org/volunteer...

HOW TO STORE BOK CHOY You can store in a plastic bag with a tea towel in the refrigerator, or I also like to store in a sealed glass container with a dry tea towel. In either case, use bok choy within a few days of purchasing. HOW TO COOK BOK CHOY Bok choy can be used in soups, stir fry, grilled, roasted, or left raw. Because the leaves and stalks have such different textures, it can be great for adding layers to a meal: buttery leaves and slightly bitter, crisp stalks. Separate the leaves from the stalks to avoid overcooking the tender greens. Cut an inch from the bottom of the heads, then separate the leaves from the stems and rinse thoroughly. If you’re looking to leave the heads whole, don’t trim, but still wash well. A few notes about cooking: bok choy shouldn’t be overcooked. The crisp texture will give way to an...

To store them place them in a plastic perforated bag so that they will get some air flow. Do not wash the beans or snap the ends until you are ready to prepare them. The beans are best when served shortly after harvesting, but if necessary they can be stored up to 5 days in the refrigerator. If beans are not going to be used within 5 days, they can be frozen or canned to preserve. They should be preserved the day they are harvested for best results. When preparing beans snap or cut off the stem ends. The tips can be removed if desired but they do not need to be removed. When cutting your fresh green beans up before cooking remember that the less you cut the beans up the sweeter and crisper they will be after they are cooked. TRY THESE RECIPES: Parmesan Roasted Green Beans Pan Fried Green Beans and Potatoes Honey Lemon Chicken Green Beans         ENJOY!      ...

KOHLRABI BASICS: It's a member of the cabbage family The whole plant is edible, but usually, when we talk about kohlrabi we mean the bulb of the plant, as we do here. The bulb kind of tastes like broccoli stems (my favorite part of broccoli!) It doesn't have to be peeled, but the peel can be tough so I usually do. You can eat it raw in slaws and salads, as well as roasted and stir-fried. Kohlrabi is a unique and tasty veggie. It requires a bit more prep time but is totally worth it. Here are a few details on how to cut it: Cut off the stems: If the stems and leaves are still attached to the kohlrabi, cut them off. (Save the leaves and cook them just like kale or turnip greens.) Slice in half: Cut the kohlrabi head in half down through its center. Slice into quarters: Place the halved kohlrabi cut...